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Category Archives: Health and nutrition

Its all about chocolate and cocoa with a conscience.

Biochemical processes.

During fermentation the beans undergo a journey through complex biochemical processes. The sensitivity of this process is impressive. Small differences in factors like atmospheric temperature, volumes and spacing of aeration can have profound effects on the flavor that develops throughout the process.

Bron: Agrofloresta Mesoamericana op Instagram:

 

Fancy Chocolate versus Cheap Stuff

Put down the Hershey’s. Once you read this, you might not ever want to waste a dollar on one of those flimsy bars again.We understand that those artisan truffle chocolates and lavender-infused confections are a decadent and costly investment. We know you read online that dark chocolate had antioxidant-boosting power. And we bet you figured Nestle’s cheap dark chocolate morsels were enough to fit the bill.[related]

Bron: Fancy Chocolate Is Way Healthier Than the Cheap Stuff

 

You’ll fit right in if…

Bron: Well Tempered Group Guidelines – Google Docs

 

This Chocolate Company Helps Save Endangered Lemurs in Madagascar

Brooklyn-based Madécasse has created a safe haven for the animals in their cacao plantations.
Chocolate: Humans have been eating for almost 4,000 years and we love it so much we go out of our way to try convince ourselves it’s actually the healthiest food on the planet. But, what if the delicious chocolate we crave could do more than just taste good (or possibly benefit our brains when consumed in the correct quantities)? For instance, what if your favorite chocolate also benefitted local endangered species? Well, that’s exactly what Brooklyn-based Madécasse is doing with lemurs in Madagascar.

“90 percent of Madagascar’s plants and animals are indigenous, but so many of the trees have been cut down and so many of the species are dying out,” says Madécasse’s marketing director, Sarah Shah. “So what we’re finding is that since we’re working with the farmers to plant more of these trees and replenish areas that are deforested, we’re also creating a natural habitat for endangered species.”

Bron: This Chocolate Company Helps Save Endangered Lemurs in Madagascar | Food & Wine

 

“The taste of chocolate depends on a number of factors…”

“The taste of chocolate depends on a number of factors such as the genetics of the cacao bean, as well as how much time you leave it to ferment and dry. This is what really makes the difference. It’s not about the mix-ins”. Local producers like the Arhuaco people are learning how to do it working hand by hand with our experts.

Bron: Cacao Hunters op Instagram: “

 

Original Beans: Schokolade, die alle glücklich macht.

Original Beans: Schokolade, die alle glücklich macht

Bron: Original Beans: Schokolade, die alle glücklich macht – Essen ist toll

 

The removal of shell is an important step in the process of making cocoa mass.

The removal of shell is an important step in the process of making cocoa mass. Codex standard n. 141–1983, rev 1–2001 by Codex Alimentarius sets maximum tolerance values for cocoa shell in chocolate mass. Apart from the legal requirements, proper removal of shell is a prerequisite for a good quality product: Shell, by its very nature, is exposed to external factors and will have picked up undesirable contaminants.

Shell does not contribute positively to the flavor of the final product and may indeed produce off-flavors. Being a very fibrous material, it is extremely ‘hard’ and consequently difficult to grind which leads to abrasion of the grinding equipment.
Moreover, shell separation from the nib influences the yield, and the loss of small nib particles along with the shell is a particularly important financial factor. Ideally, the shell should separate perfectly leaving large pieces of shell and almost the intact nib. The shell around some beans cannot be removed easily however, with certain origins being particularly difficult.

Bron: Foodensity op Instagram: “The removal of shell is an important step in the process of making cocoa mass. Codex standard n. 141–1983, rev 1–2001 by Codex Alimentarius…”

 
 
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