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Vintage Photos Show Puerto Rico 100 Years Ago

Recent hurricanes have devastated the region, but in 1924, the island was booming.

Bron: Vintage Photos Show Puerto Rico 100 Years Ago

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De waarde van goedkope chocolade 

De prijs van een reep chocolade is, ook met Fairtrade, dermate laag, dat veel, vooral Afrikaanse boeren, geen menswaardig leven kunnen leiden.

Bron: De waarde van goedkope chocolade – ClearChox

 

Cocoa Prices Have Crashed but Smugglers Are Still Making Money – Bloomberg

Ghana’s cocoa board pays $27 more for a bag of beans than it’s worth in Ivory Coast. Illicit traders are profiting from the difference.

“Cocoa farmers are supposed to have money, but here we are very poor”

Bron: Cocoa Prices Have Crashed but Smugglers Are Still Making Money – Bloomberg

 

Why do we love chocolate?

 

This is one of the many reasons for loving chocolate… Just awesome…

 

That bitter flavour in your chocolate bar?

Well-known brands, such as Mars and Nestle, are buying through global traders cocoa that is grown illegally in dwindling national parks and reserves in Ivory Coast and Ghana, environmental group Mighty Earth said.
“Every consumer of chocolate is a part of either the problem or the solution,” said Etelle Higonnet, campaign director at Mighty Earth.
“You can choose to buy ethical chocolate. Or you’re voting with your dollar for deforestation.”
Mars and Nestle said they are working to tackle deforestation.
“We take a responsible approach to sourcing cocoa and have committed to source 100 per cent certified sustainable cocoa by 2020,” Mars said in an email.
Both companies have committed to join the Cocoa and Forests Initiative, a major effort to end deforestation in the global cocoa supply chain, launched in March.

“We will be working to ensure human rights are given a high priority alongside the environmental aims of this initiative,” Nestle said in emailed comments.
Almost one-third of 23 protected natural areas in Ivory Coast that researchers visited in 2015 had been almost entirely converted to illegal cocoa plantations, the report said.
Researchers said the practice is so widespread that villages of tens of thousands of people, along with churches and schools, have sprung up in national parks to support the cocoa economy.
Ivory Coast, Francophone West Africa’s biggest economy, is the world’s top cocoa grower.
While the bulk of its 1 million cocoa farmers ply their trade legally, Washington-based Mighty Earth estimates about a third of cocoa is grown illegally in protected areas.

Deforestation for cocoa happens in sight of authorities and chocolate traders are aware of it, they said.
Loss of natural forests is problematic because they act as a home for the region’s wildlife, and a key weapon against climate change, absorbing carbon dioxide – a major driver of climate change – as they grow.
Available land for new cocoa plantations in Ivory Coast ran out long ago, so farmers have moved into parks and reserves, taking advantage of a decade of political crisis that ended in 2011.
Ivory Coast’s now has about 2.5 million hectares of natural forest, a fifth of what it had at independence in 1960, according to European Union figures. Most of the losses have been due to expanding agriculture.
The government has struggled to evict farmers from forest reserves amid accusations in 2013 of human rights abuses by security forces.
Details of the Cocoa and Forests Initiative, which is initially focusing on Ivory Coast and Ghana, will be announced by November’s global climate talks in Bonn.

Bron: That bitter flavour in your chocolate bar? It’s the taste of African deforestation and wildlife endangerment | South China Morning Post

 

“What scares me the most about “targeted markets”…

What scares me the most about “targeted markets” is that big chocolate companies seem to target ignorance more than anything else 🍫📌
“Let’s throw any crap at them, they don’t know how to recognize the good stuff anyway.”
The latest innovations from big chocolate manufacturers never target those markets who have a long-time experience with chocolate. Like Europe for example, where people are most likely to recognize a good product because of a long-time tradition, a certain familiarity and daily use and consumption of that food 🔎🍫
Nope, that would be too challenging, and consumers would sense a badly made product from a distance.
Let’s bring our cheaply produced and full-of-crap new chocolate product to a place where people don’t have enough education on the matter to understand or be concerned with what they are eating, like China for example 🇨🇳✈
Chinese people don’t have a tradition of eating chocolate, as they are just opening up to the idea of chocolate as a food that can be consumed more often than just in special occasions. So you can imagine the widely-spread education on reading labels and recognizing quality in chocolate products (like I would personally have no clue on how to recognize a good tea or a good soy sauce).
Never the focus on education though 💁‍♀️🌱
Only on getting as much money as possible out of a new full wallet. And the “saturated market” is just an excuse to me. With a great reputation and a great chocolate, any saturated market will welcome a new product with enthusiasm 🎉🍫
Unfortunately, most of these big chocolate manufacturers are lacking both.
What are your thoughts on chocolate and the Chinese market? 👇

Bron: Sharon Terenzi op Instagram: “What scares me the most about “targeted markets” is that big chocolate companies seem to target ignorance more than anything else 🍫📌 “Let’s…” • Instagram

 

“Fermentation process consists of removing the beans from the cacao pods and stacking them together in order to allow the microorganisms to…” • 

Fermentation process consists of removing the beans from the cacao pods and stacking them together in order to allow the microorganisms to initiate the fermentation process of the pulp surrounding the beans.

Bron: CasaLuker Cacao Fino de Aroma op Instagram:

 
 
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