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Chocolade-onlinekopen-Chocolate /3

PAGINA 3 VAN ONZE CHOCOLADE ONLINE KOPEN. KOM GERUST LANGS OM MEER TE ONTDEKKEN LANGS DEZE WEG OF VIA DE FACEBOOKpagina  VRAGEN? mail ME GERUST.

Verderzetting van verscheidene “brands” die eveneens in onze winkel te koop zijn en waar je deze dan ook kan komen proeven, het voordeel van een winkel. Als je de afstand niet wilt overbruggen of je kent deze chocolades al is het eenvoudig om deze online te bestellen natuurlijk. Ik steek bij de verzending dan ook steeds weer een verrassing het leuke aan online-kopen.

Hoe ga je te werk? Je geeft me via een mail door welke chocolades je wenst te ontvangen en ik antwoord je binnen de 24 uur met het te betalen bedrag en het rek.nummer waar je het bedrag kan storten. Zodra wij dit ontvangen hebben sturen wij zo vlug mogelijk per post je zending.

Kosten van de verzending komen steeds op € 10,-/ waar ook in België, belangrijk is dat je deze kosten kan vermijden bij een bestelling vanaf € 55,-

INDIEN JE VIA DE LINKS NOG WAT ANDERS WENST TE BESTELLEN? MAIL ME GERUST.

Chocolate Tree Handcrafted from bean to bar Schotland

driemaal Madagascar, tweemaal Peru en éénmaal Coconut milk: €7.50,-/80g.

links: ChoctreeWebpage     ChocTreeblog

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Chchukululu Ecuador the land of fine cocoa, no lecithin, no vanilla.

65% macadamia & 65% Arriba dark: €5.25,-/ 50g.

links: Chchublog     Chchuwebpage     beterewereld

Akesson’s Single Plantation Chocolate

op dit ogenblik beperkt aanbod (later meer): €6.00,-/60g.

links: website     AkesFacebook     Akesson’s100%YouTube     ChocTrading

Tejas Chocolate Single Origin Cacao Stone ground Austin TX

vijf keer 70% van verschillende origines: €6.00,-/56g.

links: website     TejasFacebook     TejasExcellent

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Hoya Verde organic chocolate Ecuador

Fino de Aroma 100%, 80%, 72%: €4.00,-/50g

links: website     HoyaVerdeFacebook     Cocoarunners

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Cacao Hunters origin Colombia 

Fino de aroma 64%-,52% Nevada, 70% Tumaco en 70% Arauca: €6.00,-/56g

links: website     wordpressHunters     beantobar

 

Maracaibo Criolait 38%, Costa Rica 40%, Esmeraldas 42%: 200g/8.00,-

Maracaibo 88%, Centenario 70% en Centenario Crudo (stoneground)70%: 200g/8.00,-

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Felchlin not only stands for a single product but for consistent thought and action with regard to quality, which permeates the entire company. The formulated and practised values are thereby our driving force from both within and without. As a niche manufacturer, Felchlin has become a specialist to manufacture superior Grand Cru Chocolate, which is exclusively supplied to confectioners and chocolate masters.

links: website    Wikipedia   

TOT HIER PAGINA CHOCOLADES ONLINE 3, binnenkort pagina 4…

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Original Beans – Edel Weiss 40%, Organic White Chocolate, Dominican Republic

EDEL WEISS 40%, ORGANIC WHITE CHOCOLATE, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Bron: Original Beans – Edel Weiss 40%, Organic White Chocolate, Dominican Republic

 

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Chocolates for Lee McCoy

Finally I did send boxes of chocolates to Lee McCoy and I’m glad I did, thanks Lee for asking me several times.

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Flavours description of the box: (starting left above) 
Marzipan 43%, Madre 3 peppers, Felchlin 70% centenario crudo, 
Akesson’s milk 40%, Marou 65%, ElCeibo 71%,
Daintree 44%, Esmeralda 42% sea salt, The Grenada Chocolate Company 71% cocoa nibs,
Cru Virunga&Marc de Champagne, Felchlin – World’s best chocolateGhana 60% Cru Suhum and Original Beans Cru Virunga

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Planet e: De chocolade-jager

Specifieke cacaobonen. Echter steeds zeldzamer geworden, cacaoplantages vervangen door door palmolieplantages of gewoon gewist. “Planet e” vergezeld de Zwitserse Felix Inderbitzin, chef koper van Felchlin en chocoladefabrikant. Prospectie door het tropische regenwoud in Zuid-Amerika op zoek naar de meest aromatische cacaobonen in de wereld.

De Chocolade-jager

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For the first time I’m savouring “fine, organic and fair”chocolate from Ghana.

Thanks to a special friend: Sepp Schoenbachler.

Felchlin has processed cacao from Ghana, West Africa for many years. Until recently, it was impossible to acquire the cacao beans directly from the producers. The project Yayra Glover has enabled us to eliminate this problem and allow us to guarantee the origin of our cacao beans from Ghana, therby specifying traceability to the origin.

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Ghana Cocoa-of-origin

The history of cocoa in Ghana
The fist missionaries from the Basle Mission were sent to the then Gold Coast, today’s
Ghana, in the year 1828. According to the story, these missionaries, who were working together
with Tetteh Quarshie, brought cocoa into the country. Around 1870, the Ghanaian
Tetteh Quarshie worked for a few years on an island in the Gulf of Guinea. The island, on
which cocoa was already grown, was a Spanish colony. Despite the strict prohibition, Tetteh
Quarshie succeeded in smuggling a few cocoa beans into his homeland on his return to
Ghana and successfully raised cocoa plants from them. The Spanish-Portuguese cocoa monopoly
was thereby broken, and the valuable beans found their way to Africa.

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The importance of cocoa in Ghana today
Ghana is the second largest export country for cocoa in the world. For the last 60 years, all
the cocoa grown in Ghana had to be sold to the “Ghana Cocoa Board”. This government organisation
controlled and marketed all the cocoa, either for export or for domestic use (local
processors). The raw material cocoa is one of the main sources of foreign exchange for Ghana
and is therefore of enormous importance.

The Yayra Glover Company and its vision
According to the vision of the Ghanaian Yayra Glover, cocoa production in Ghana should be
realigned in the future. His company wants to cultivate and market the cocoa from the entire
Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar district in line with both, organic and Fairtrade guidelines. And all of
this with the active support of Swiss agronomists.

In doing this, Yayra Glover trains and informs the farmers about local, regional, national and
even international topics. Important issues such as child labour, organic food, natural plant
protection and sustainable agriculture are thereby central. However, in addition, the people
should also be given the means and the opportunities to themselves bring about changes in
their own lives.

He also sees his task as being the general improvement of the well-being of the farmers and
their families by means of smaller social research activities. Students from universities have
the opportunity to work for agricultural communities, to collect data and to create practical
recommendations that can be implemented at the local level in order to raise the prosperity
of the population.

Through tireless work, Yayra Glover succeeded in convincing the “Ghana Cocoa Board”
about his project. He is thereby the first person who is able to sell his cocoa directly to his
customers, of course with the support and approval of the Cocoa Board.

Cocoa from the Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar district, Ghana
The Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar district, from which Felchlin now obtains its Ghanaian cocoa,
lies on the southern edge of a large forest area, 60 km north-west of the capital city Accra.
Coastal savannah extends towards the south, while the Aburi chain of hills forms a natural
border to the east, with the protected Attewa forest to the north-west. The entire district is
relatively hilly, with flat valleys intersected by rivers and streams.

CacaoGhanaYayra Glover, a Ghanaian with strong ties to Switzerland, is the founder of the project “Suhum Cacao”. He studied and worked in Switzerland for many years and his family still lives here. His vision is to cultivate cacao in the Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar district under the organic and Fairtrade certification labels. In this way, he hopes to support his countrymen by producing a premium quality cacao that would secure their future financial existence.

The cacao cultivation incorporates an area of approximately 6’500 ha, which involves around 2’600 small cacao farmers. After long negotiations, Yayra Glover convinced the Ghana Cacao Board of his project. His efforts have born fruit and he is the first, except for the Ghana government, who is authorised by the Cacao Board to sell cacao from the Suhum district to Felchlin Switzerland.

Main harvest
October – January

The cacao beans from Ghana are primarly blended with other cacao beans and used in Felchlin Switzerland Surfine and Classic couvertures.

Cru Suhum 40% flavour profile: the balanced cacao flavour leads to a harmonius play of fresh milk with a nuance of caramel. The finish begins with a pleasant malt note to be completed with a mild marzipan flavour.

Cru Suhum 60% flavour profile: the aroma experience of Cru Suhum couverture is distinguished by a harmonius cacao flavour enrobing the strong coffee note. The slow, traditional processing method allows the fruity, sweet pineapple flavour to develop. The finish is complimented through a nuance of dried pear encased in a sustained black tea flavour.

 

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The Premium Chocolate Movement: The treat of centralisation.

THE THREAT OF CENTRALISATION

Organic chocolate company Green & Blacks were seeking both high quality and organically
produced cocoa when they first approached the Mayan cocoa farmers of Belize in 1993. Green &
Blacks incentivised the growers to tear out the stock of Forastero (a variety that the Hershey
corporation convinced them to plant) and re-plant the native Criollo species. They also offered a
five-year contract for the organically grown beans at a guaranteed price of USD$1.75 per pound.
The quality of Belize cocoa improved to become the best in the region, because growers were
assured a return on the required investment of money and time. The added income also allowed
farmers to send their children to school — high school enrolment increased from 10% of the
community’s children to 70%.

cacaoblancode PiuraCacao blanco de Piura

 

However the Green & Blacks story did not end there. In 2005, amidst a wave of acquisitions
and takeovers of small organics companies by multinational food manufacturers, Green & Blacks
was bought by Cadburys. Each year since, the organic chocolate company have pressured the
Mayan growers in Belize to increase their yields in order to meet the growing demand, an increase
they cannot sustain if they are to continue with their traditional methods of farming. Following the
acquisition of Green & Blacks by Cadbury, the American chocolate giant Hershey bought organic
chocolate company Dagoba. These acquisitions pose a great threat the to the premium chocolate
movement. If large corporations move in and attempt to drive prices down, as was seen in across
the organics movement in the last decade, then premium chocolate will not be able to maintain
their high level of quality, or the new trade links that benefit growers.

As sociologist David Harvey explains “we still live, in the West, in a society where production
for profit remains the basic organizing principle of economic life.” Regardless of their passion for
quality and social values, to exist, a chocolate company must make a profit. This means consumers
must be willing to pay the high price of premium chocolate. Due to its artisanal nature, this kind of
chocolate will never be able to compete with industrial chocolate on price. Consumers can pay up to
eight times as much for a premium bar than they might for a mass-produced equivalent and the
cost to the producer begins with the very first step: the price they pay for quality beans. Alex
Whitmore notes that Taza pay a USD$1500 premium per metric tonne above the New York Board
of Trade price and USD$250 above Fair Trade. The beans they import arrive in small shipments of
jute bags, a more expensive method of transport than bulk container shipping and flat storage, and
their inability to warehouse their ingredients means they must pay the current market price for
sugar, which can vary enormously week to week.iv Their processes are labour intensive and slow,
and their production output is limited by the size of the machinery. In order to remain profitable, premium chocolate producers must be able to cover these costs, and make a margin above them. In order to persuade consumers to pay this high price, they must first be convinced of premium chocolate’s value.

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CONNOISSEURSHIP AND AUTHENTICITY

He may be a fondeur and not a bean-to-bar producer, but Linxe is still a very important figure
in the premium chocolate movement. He was a driving force behind the creation of Le Guide du
Chocolat, the Michelin Guide of chocolate, first published in 1981. Anthropologist Susan Terrio
states that this was the first publication to use the language of wine appreciation in order to codify
chocolate consumption. “An explicit goal was to extend the oenological model and to provide the
public with ‘a more detailed, precise, and refined chocolate vocabulary.’”
Linxe’s efforts were rewarded — today a growing group of chocolate connoisseurs, including
producers, journalists and chocolate aficionados, use this borrowed vocabulary in a lively discourse
of chocolate. They discuss bean varieties, growing conditions, plantation and country of origin with
terms such as “grand cru”, “vintage” and “terroir”. They also consider the decisions a chocolatier
makes and how those choices impact on the final product, in the same way as wine connoisseurs
discuss how a winemaker may produce a distinctive wine.
These discussions are happening across a wide range of media. In the last decade, several
chocolate connoisseurs have published books including Chloe Doutre-Roussel, the former chocolate
buyer for Fortnum and Mason, Clay Gordon, the founder of chocolate review website
chocophile.com, and Chantal Coady, owner of Rococo chocolate store and founding member of the
UK’s Chocolate Society. Dozens of chocolate review websites have created a virtual
neighbourhood for chocolate enthusiasts who have a forum to discuss all manner of chocolate
topics from taste, to production, to the sourcing of equipment for chocolate manufacturing.
Clay Gordon claims that “appreciation of the chocolate-making process is as invaluable to a
chocolate lover’s enjoyment as an understanding of the winemaking process is to a wine connoisseur,” and many in the premium chocolate industry are offering consumers first hand experience of the process. In my time with Silvio Bessone two separate groups visited his workshop. He gave each group an overview of his chocolate making process and the choices he makes at each stage. The tour included a tasting of selected products to understand better how those choices impacted on the chocolate. Taza chocolatier Alex Whitmore leads tours to the plantations with whom they have Direct Trade relationships to teach consumers about cocoa cultivation.

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There are also online videos, such as the popular short film on the process at the Mast Brothers
workshop in Brooklyn, and articles detailing the day in the life of a famous chocolatier.
These tours, books, websites and other media are a platform for the connoisseur, something
Robert Linxe recognised as crucial to the continued success of his industry. Using wine vocabulary
to discuss bean varieties, growing conditions and geographical characteristics, connoisseurs create a
powerful association between chocolate and nature. Additionally connoisseurs highlight the
passion, dedication and sincerity of the chocolatier, and thereby distinguish the chocolate artisan’s product from the anonymously produced industrial version. According to Josee Johnston and Shyon Baumann, these are the qualities associated with an “authentic” framing of a food product. Based on their thorough analysis of gourmet food writing, they list these qualities as: “creation by hand rather than by industrial processes; local settings and anticommercialism; sincere expression distant from calculation or strategy; honesty, integrity, or dedication to core principles; and closeness to nature combined with distance from institutionalized power sources.”

next time: THE VALUE OF PREMIUM CHOCOLATE

Thanks to my friend Susan Hoban who shared this Final Thesis: Master of Food Culture and Communication

 

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The Premium Chocolate Movement: Effecting Change With The Creation Of Value 3

ALTERNATIVE TRADE LINKS FOR QUALITY COCOA GROWERS

Raymond Bonnat, Stephane’s father and the second family member to act as manager, celebrated the hundredth anniversary of the Bonnat Chocolate company in 1984 with a world-first idea: single-origin bars. Stephane describes how difficult it was in those days to source quality. Bonnat paid growers premium prices for their top quality beans, he said, but they bought in such small volumes they couldn’t keep these plantations afloat. Family owned plantations of less than two hectares comprise 85% of global cocoa production and when cocoa prices tumbled in the years after market liberalisation, many small plantations were forced out of business. The premium chocolate movement is changing this, driving demand for quality cocoa to
levels that are sustainable for small plantations. The ICCO noted that while the volume of chocolate consumption is increasing at a very slow rate in mature markets such as Europe and the US, the volume of cocoa consumption is increasing rapidly: “The new trend in chocolate consumption has been characterized by the increasing appeal of premium chocolates and, in particular, of high cocoa content dark chocolate…

According to Euromonitor, in the past five years up to 2008, the growth has been mainly driven by single-origin chocolate which grew by over 20% per annum and dark chocolate (up by over 15%).”

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Larry Slotnick, co-founder of Taza Chocolate, said that the only way to ensure a supply of high quality beans, and that the premiums they paid made it into the hands of the farmers, was to go to the plantation level.They practice “Direct Trade”, a term used to describe a system of purchasing developed by specialty coffee roasters in the US. It means that Taza chocolatiers visit the plantations that provide their beans, develop long-term relationships with growers, and teach them how to achieve the standard of quality that Taza require for their chocolate. They sign contracts with these growers that guarantee a minimum price per pound that is considerably higher than the average price of the commodities market. The benefit of these relationships to growers is enormous. Firstly they learn how to improve the quality of their cocoa, information lost when the
marketing boards and other government bodies were dismantled. Secondly they offer the growers
a guaranteed buyer for their crop, empowering them to invest in long-term activities that will further improve the quality of their beans.

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The International Cocoa Association (ICCO), recognising the potential of this system, have initiated several projects to help reestablish a premium trade chain. These include a supply chain management initiative called “Total Quality”, that separates cocoa bean lots so that quality beans can be identified and sold directly to buyers.  They have also initiated a competition called “Cocoa of Excellence”. These awards are modelled on the highly successful Cup of Excellence (COE) awards in the specialty coffee industry, in which small batches of quality coffee are blind tasted by a panel of experts, and given a rating out of 100. The coffees that score over 90 are auctioned to speciality buyers who attend the event. Consulting firm McKinsey & Company audited the award system in Nicaragua in 2006, and determined that it helped Nicaraguan coffee producers, cooperatives and exporters to earn an additional $USD1.1 million profit, and considerably strengthened Nicaragua’s specialty coffee industry. Whilst the ICCO initiatives are in their infancy, they are positive steps to the creation of an alternative system of trade, one that rewards growers financially for quality beans.

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next time: THE THREAT OF CENTRALISATION

Thanks to a friend Susan Hoban who shared this Final Thesis: Master of Food Culture and Communication

 

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