RSS

Tag Archives: Indonesia

One bar -Original Beans- one tree. (Philipp Kaufmann)

1909201492

Original Beans komt uit de kast met heerlijke NIEUWE chocolades!!

Enige tijd geleden had ik het genoegen om de nog in “testfase” samples van deze chocolades te mogen proeven. En eerlijk gezegd ze waren toen reeds het proeven waard, nu deze “BRAND NEW” chocolate bars zijn nog stukken beter geworden.

  • GRAND CRU BLEND NO.1 80%: ORGANIC DARK CHOCOLATE OF WORLD’S RAREST CACAO VARIETALS RAINFOREST HOTSPOTS IN SOUTH AMERICA AND AFRICA.
  • FEMMES DE VIRUNGA 55%: ORGANIC MILK COCOLATE SUPPORTING WOMEN CACAO FARMERS, PRESERVING AFRICA’S OLDEST NATURE PARK EASTERN CONGO (D.R).
  • PAPUA KERAFAT 68%: DARK CHOCOLATE FROM HISTORIC CACAO VARIETY, REDISCOVERED IN RAINFOREST OF PAPUA, INDONESIA.
  • EDEL WEIS 40%: ORGANIC WHITE CHOCOLATE WITHOUT VANILLA, GROWN IN YUNA RIVER VALLEY, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.

More words really are not needed here, just try to get some of these wonderfull chocolate bars.

Thanks to Vera Hofman & Gerrit Leenheer.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Chocolate Forever 7 Safeguarding supply

The risk that cocoa suppliers will not be able to meet the required demand is a serious threat to the cocoa sector. The trees that produce cocoa beans are generally old, are rooted in over-farmed soil, and are tended by poor farmers with little if any formal educaton. The majority of farmers are smallholders, which means that they grow cocoa as a cash crop on a small plot of land, along with food crops and occasionally also with other cash crops. From the income generated by these cash crops they pay their hospital bills, debts, their children’s school expenses. Farmers rarely have any remaining financial means to utilise for on-farm investments. Crop losses are a huge problem, as a large portion of the harvest is usually lost to pest and diseases. Money to invest in new plant material, fertilizer or pesticides is lacking; the know-how to apply it is scarce. Farmers often work by themselves and receive little support in terms of training, advice, or access to credit. In this context, exasperated by poor infrastructure and their marginal position farmers sometimes keep their children from school and allow them to help or work on the farm.

VSO Cadbury Cocoa partnership Ghana VSO Cadbury Cocoa partnershipBecause of these appalling conditions, the continuity of cocoa production is under threat. First, there is an exodus from the countryside as youngsters see no future there and seek other possibilities by migrating to the city. Additionally, crops like rubber, cassava, and oil palms have become more profitable for farmers. Cocoa production in West Africa shows a decreasing trend of 2% per year, while, at the same time, demand for cocoa products, including high quality chocolate, is expected to increase in the near future. The cocoa industry is concerned about these developments and faces a majpr challenge: how to assure that supply continues to meet demand.

In order to assure that farmers remain in the cocoa business and increase the quantity and quality of their production, industry partners are investing heavily in farmers. Multinational companies have their own initiatives, they are also increasingly collaborating to jointly tackle the problem of supply failure. Not only cocoa companies, but also goverments, financial institutions, NGOs, labour unions and certifiers have been joining forces to provide support to farmers. A example of such efforts is the international Cocoa Livelihoods Program. Thhis program focuses on enhancing farmer knowledge, improving farmer marketing skills on agriculturally diversified farms. The Dutch have positioned themselves as leaders in the proces of mainstreaming sustainable cocoa. It is estimated that Dutch companies will invest around $325 million in sustainable cocoa during the course of the next several years (accessed15 July 2010). In the Netherlands a number of industry players have united forces, together with goverment and members of civel society, realise the goal of sustainable cocoa and, addressing the risk of supplier failure, to improve yields and profitability for farmers. One of the results is the UTZ CERTIFIED Cocoa Program, established by several multinational companies.

Chocolate unwrapped

With this initiative they want to at least double the current yields of approximately 400 kg / ha by training farmers in modern farming techniques, using new plant material and increased use of fertilizer. They also want to increase dialogue with authorities to improve enabling factors. The program focuses on the largest producer countries: Ivory Coast, Ghana, Indonesia, Nigeria, Cameroon, and Ecuador. By focusing on capacity building in the source locations and providing farmer training, the program aims to improve the farmers’ productivity and the quality of their produce; which ultimately should be rewarded by the market, under the maxim: ‘Better price for better products’.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Hmm Chocolate!

Cocoa trees are abundant in Gran Couva, Trinidad, West Indies where there used to be large cocoa estates.

Morning folks!

Inspired by Mother’s Day, I was going to post flowers.  But instead I wanted to share this lovely cocoa pod. Most of the world’s cocoa is produced in West and Central Africa, Latin America, Indonesia and a little in the Caribbean. Most of the world’s finest chocolate is consumed, and it’s profits enjoyed and North America and Europe. Enjoy the photo, enjoy your day, and perhaps share a bit of chocolate with someone.

source: http://studiolafoncettephotography.wordpress.com/2011/05/09/hmm-chocolate/

Photo taken by Leslie Robertson Toney, Studio Lafoncette Photography

 

Tags: , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: