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Among the pioneers of the US craft chocolate…

Amano is veruit de meest gelauwerde chocolademaker van Amerika. Punt. Waarom is geen geheim, met Amano’s uitgesproken benadering gebruik makend van zowel de Amerikaanse als Europese stijl van chocolade maken. Je vind de kenmerken van de licht geroosterde cacao die je zou verwachten van een ‘avant-gardistische’ Amerikaanse maker, maar in balans gebracht met zachte cacao boter en aromatische vanille van de meer vooruitstrevende Europese chocolade makers. Geen serieuze chocolade selectie is compleet zonder Amano Chocolate.

En daarom hebben wij in ons assortiment deze uitzonderlijke chocolademaker opgenomen en met mondjesmaat gaan verkopen aan de aandachtige chocoladekenners die Art Pollart naar waarde weten schatten.

You can’t possibly go wrong with Amano chocolate. Among the pioneers of the US craft chocolate movement, chocolate maker Art Pollard started making chocolate from the beans in 2006 in Orem, Utah. Since then, the company has grown to be recognized as an excellence in the industry, winning countless prizes and awards for its single-origin and inclusion bars.
If you want to buy Amano’s bars for yourself or your loved ones, check out in our store and feel free to ask more about them.

Amano Guayas, Ecuador 70%
Rich chocolate flavor, green banana, blackberry, smoke, cedar, molasses
Amano Ocumare, Venezuela 70%
Gentle chocolate flavor, plum, smoke, espresso
(Note, these are natural flavors of the cocoa beans Amano uses in the chocolate — not added flavors.)
Amano Cuyagua, Venezuela 70%
Rich chocolate flavor, apricot, melon, and exotic spices

Amano Morobe, Papua New Guinea 70%
Rich chocolate flavor, lime, red grapefruit, leather, earthiness, and spice.
Amano Macoris, Dominican Republic 70%
Molasses, brown sugar, cream, caramel, nuts and dried apricots.

Amano Cardamom Black Pepper
Rich dark Dos Rios chocolate with bergamot orange, blueberry and lavender notes made out of Dominican Republic cacao beans. The magical flavor of cardamom with the slight warmth of black pepper. Crunch bits make it extra electrifying.
Amano Mango Chili
Rich dark Guayas chocolate with green banana and blackberry notes made out of cacao beans of Ecuador. Rich creamy mango with the warmth of chili peppers.

available http://www.patisserievercruysse.be

 

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Chocolate as salad.

 

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Tips for pairing chocolates and wine

Chocolate comes in many varieties much like wine. Many people can’t imagine pairing chocolate with a fine wine, but the complexity and differences of both can make for an exciting, flavorful match.

Choosing your pairs
It’s important to remember that most wine-pairing guidelines are just that… guidelines. There are no hard and fast rules. You may find that while you prefer dark chocolate with a nutty, roasty Cabernet, your equally wine- or food-savvy friend may go for a vintage Port. But if you’re a wine and chocolate-pairing novice, follow these quick tips to match your favorite decadence with just the right wine.

White chocolate pairings
White chocolate is mellow and buttery. Its flavor makes it ideal for softer wines like Sherry or an Orange Muscat. Some people also like it with a light (often white) Zinfandel.
Sherry increases the creaminess of white chocolate, while Orange Muscat picks up any light fruit tones that may be present in some white chocolates (depending on the maker). Zinfandel is actually a contrasting flavor because of its heavy tannin content, but some tasters appreciate the dynamic flavors. Overall white chocolates usually go best with dessert wines.

Milk chocolate
The creaminess of milk chocolate pairs with a Ruby Port, Pinot Noir or light-bodied Merlot (or other light-bodied, light-flavored wines). Dessert wines (Rieslings, Muscats, etc.) may also be a good complement. These types of wines pair well with milk chocolate because the mild tannin levels underscore the creamy flavor without overpowering it.

Dark or intense dark chocolate
Dark or bittersweet chocolate pairs with a variety of wines and often make some of the most interesting pairings. Since they’re often more complex themselves, they usually require a more complex wine to accompany them.

Look for a wine that’s a little more robust (maybe even a roast-y or nutty flavor). In fact, many wines, especially Cabernets and Zinfandels, often have their own hint of chocolate flavor. Try a robust Pinot Noir or full-bodied Merlot, a Cabernet Sauvignon or a Tawny or Vintage Port.

Wine & chocolate tasting
The best way to find out your favorite chocolate and wine combination is trial and error. Make it fun by hosting a chocolate and wine tasting with some of your friends. Just buy a selection of wines and fine chocolates and invite everyone to taste (starting with the lightest flavors first) and choose their favorites.

 

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La ciencia confirma que el chocolate y el vino son los mejores remedios para las arrugas – Mi Libro De Ideas

pairing chocolate and wine

 

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Chocolate: tree to bar.

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A day without chocolate…

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Chocolate makes no exception

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“Of all the different transformations we call cooking, I think fermentation is the most miraculous, and the most mysterious. That is because it doesn’t involve any applied heat at all.

This is food and drink made strictly through the action of bacteria and fungi. They perform all the transformations that normally we need heat to make happen.

People don’t realize, as they walk through the supermarket, how many fermented foods are there”. – Michael Pollan

Chocolate makes no exception!

credit-Reveca-Tapie

Fermenting the cocoa beans anywhere from 3 to 7 days is a crucial step in the making of any chocolate product because it has a HUGE influence on how the chocolate will taste, and how its intrinsic flavors and aromas develop.

source: the chocolate journalist

 

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