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Category Archives: Cocao Plantation

Its all about chocolate and cocoa with a conscience.

New Cacao Clones Developed In Ecuador.

In Ecuador, the “Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias” (INIAP) has generated more than 16 genotypes, among them the recently released clones: INIAP EETP 800 Aroma Pichilingue e INIAP EETP 801 Fino Pichilingue. These have a range of action approved for the central area of production in Ecuador, in the area near the upper basin of the Guayas River. Tests are conducted on the Coastal region for future approval, but only 2 years from now, when results are gathered, can the clones be recommended. High endurance can be measured based on the result that the Nacional cacao regenerated by the INIAP has a production between 1 to 1,2 t/ha. CCN51 cacao production has oscillated between 1,5 to 2 t/ha. Nowadays with the new clones we are expecting an average of 2 t/ha. The new clones are a hybrid between National cacao and CCN-51 and they have inherited the high productivity characteristic from the CCN-51 but also the quality of Nacional cacao.

Bron: F O O D E N S I T Y op Instagram: “New Cacao Clones Developed In Ecuador (From the 11th edition of “Sabor Arriba” – March 2017) In Ecuador, the “Instituto Nacional de…”

 

The amazing thing about a Nacional plantation is that you have a history when you walk in one.

You can actually see the different clones, and the shape of the pods will tell you more or less where they were planted. Also, you can see the vegetation, the animals that are over there. It’s very magical. When you get more experience, by the shape of the fruit and the color, you will know that those beans are going to be more astringent, or more floral, or more fruity, or even nutty.” – Vicente Norero says of “reading the trees” on Episode 3. Please listen and share (link in bio).

Bron: The Slow Melt op Instagram: 

 

“An exceedingly rare ‘Acriollado’ type of cacao found in one impoverished and isolated area of Ecuador…

An exceedingly rare ‘Acriollado’ type of cacao found in one impoverished and isolated area of Ecuador. This cacao has been cultivated for at least 150 years in isolation from Ecuadorian ‘Nacional’ cacao. This is one of the few examples of a truly heirloom cacao, a variety that has been passed down from generation to generation in isolation from introgression. Sadly this term, heirloom cacao, has been repeatedly misused due to ignorance and desire for marketability.
In recent decades this cacao has been cut down and replaced with oil palm and other more productive crops. Even worse, during the last 10 years, free or heavily subsidized CCN-51 trees have been provided for these communities and are quickly gaining traction. Through proximity and cross pollination, the genetic characteristics of the few remaining stands of these trees will be gradually eroded. These farmers never received any economic reward for growing their traditional cacao variety and because it is slower growing and more susceptible to disease, you can hardly blame them for replacing it. Fortunately, we rescued several dozen fruits and have just started seeding these trees for establishment on the Costa Esmeraldas farm. Also, Hawaii Cacao Foundation used its USDA import permit to bring clean, healthy seeds to Hawaii for preservation and propagation in the disease free climate of the islands. Once multiplied, seeds and scion will made available to the public, no hoarding, trademarking, or other unscrupulous practices. Not just talk, marketing buzzwords, or hype – evidence based decisions and action.

Bron: Daniel O’Doherty op Instagram:

 

The secret of why we like to eat chocolate.

It may seem simple – we like chocolate because it tastes nice. But there’s more to it than that – and it relates to a balance that is set right from the very beginning of our lives.

Bron: The secret of why we like to eat chocolate – BBC News

 

We Eat The Seeds – The Slow Melt

Many of us have been eating chocolate since childhood, but few can recognize it in nature. In this episode, we start at the farm with the pod-shaped fruit and its bitter seeds.

Bron: Ep. 3: We Eat The Seeds – The Slow Melt

 

Cocoa’s shining light or a risky monocrop?

Cocoa and chocolate stakeholders highlight the advantages and potential pitfalls of high-yielding cocoa variety CCN-51. What part should it play in the industry’s drive for sustainability?

Bron: CCN-51: Cocoa’s shining light or a risky monocrop?

 

Flavors of Cacao – Flavor

Bron: Flavors of Cacao – Flavor

 
 
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