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Chocolade-onlinekopen-Chocolate /5

PAGINA 5 VAN ONZE” CHOCOLADE ONLINE” KOPEN. KOM GERUST NAAR ONZE WINKEL OF ONTDEK LANGS DEZE WEG WAAROM WIJ VAN CHOCOLADE HOUDEN.                                                  VRAGEN? mail of FACEBOOKpagina

Verderzetting van verscheidene “brands” die eveneens in onze winkel te koop zijn en waar je deze dan ook kan komen proeven, het voordeel van een winkel. Als je de afstand niet wilt overbruggen of je kent deze chocolades al is het eenvoudig om deze online te bestellen natuurlijk. Ik steek bij de verzending dan ook steeds weer een verrassing het leuke aan online-kopen.

Hoe ga je te werk? Je geeft me via een mail door welke chocolades je wenst te ontvangen en ik antwoord je binnen de 24 uur met het te betalen bedrag en het rek.nummer waar je het bedrag kan storten. Zodra wij dit ontvangen hebben sturen wij zo vlug mogelijk per post je zending.

Kosten van de verzending komen steeds op € 10,-/ waar ook in België, belangrijk is dat je deze kosten kan vermijden bij een bestelling vanaf € 55,-

INDIEN JE VIA DE LINKS NOG WAT ANDERS WENST TE BESTELLEN? MAIL ME GERUST.

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Hazelnoten, amandelen en cashewnoten in 55% chocolade €17.00,-/226g

“Delicious to eat or drink”, speciaal ontwikkeld voor warme chocolademelk. Oaxacan sampler 150g/€14.00,- of Mexicano 308g/ €22.00,-

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drie verschillende smaken 24g/ €2.00,-

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Taza couverture: 80% Dom.Rep en 50% Guajillo Chili 200g/ €10.00,-

Links: WebTaza     TazaFaceBook     ChocolateNoise

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Fresco Chocolate Lyden WA. USA onze verschillende soorten in stock €7.50,-/45g

Links: WebFresco     CocoarunnersFresco     UltimateChocblogFresco

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Het assortiment van Marou 70%,72%, 74%,75%,76%,78%,80% en 85% €7.25/100g.

De origin couverture is enkel per kg te koop €40,- en de blend 65%/€35,-

links: WebMarou     CocoarunnersMarou      TreasureIsland 

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Rainforest Organics product uit Peru 80% €4.00,-/80g

links: RainforestWeb

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The Grenada Chocolate Company Tree to Bar from the Caribbean

Alle tabletten zijn steeds in voorraad net als het heerlijke cocoa powder.

60% nibs, 71%, 71% zeezout, 82% en de 100%: €7.25,-/85g

cacaopoeder 170g/ €9.00,-

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links: Webpagina     FaceBookGrenada     ChocoUKGrenada     ChocolateReviewsUK

TOT HIER PAGINA CHOCOLADES ONLINE 5,

er komt nieuwe uitzonderlijke chocolade binnen maar dat is voor wat later.

De volgende pagina zal onder andere gaan over huisgemaakte producten, blijf uitkijken.

 

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D7, Togo,  Jaguars, & win chocolate!

Bron: D7, Togo,  Jaguars, & win chocolate!

 

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Caoni River which is born in the rainforest of Ecuador.

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Sinds kort volgen wij Caoni chocolade, maar dan enkel de drie origin 77% chocolades.

ESMERALDAS 77%

  • Bold chocolate flavor.
  • Very floral.
  • Balanced, neither bitter nor sour.
  • Spicy.
  • Prolonged, elegant after taste.

MANABI 77%

  • These beans are sweet; to the point that you will hardly believe it is a 77% cocoa chocolate.
  • Mild chocolate flavor at the beginning that intensifies to reach a stronger finish.
  • Perfectly balanced, neither bitter nor sour.
  • A bit spicy at the end.
  • Moderately prolonged gentle after taste.

LOS RIOS 77%

  • Intense but balanced chocolate flavor from the first bite.
  • Slightly bitter.
  • Slightly sour.
  • Slightly spicy finish.
  • Moderately prolonged subtle after taste.

Caoni create single-origin, dark chocolates that express the natural flavors, aromas and textures that only “Arriba” cocoa beans can provide. “Arriba” beans are very rare, naturally grown in the same way for hundreds of years. Caoni´s hand selected “Arriba Cacao” never requires flavors changing additives such as vanilla to change its flavor.

arribanacional

http://www.caonichocolate.com/en/

 

 

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The Brazilian Forest Chocolate

Although Brazil is one of the world’s top producers of cacao, Brazilian chocolate, on the other hand, has received very little attention. The common, everyday chocolate found on market shelves in Brazil is formulated with a higher fat content to add flavor and has less cacao compared to chocolate found in the U.S. and Europe. To put it frankly, even the most desperate chocolate connoisseur wouldn’t get near the stuff.

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The cacao trees are planted in the shadow of the Atlantic rainforest. In each area, there’s an emphasis on maximizing fruits and plants grown there, through the process of pollination. For example, the jupará is a monkey that eats cacao and throws the pits around the forest. This monkey is a big proponent of cacao, just like the birds. In accordance with each species, specific flowers are pollinated and widespread throughout the areas, so there’s a combination of new elements. Man also influences things. Various trees of diverse fruits are planted together with cacao. In the end, when it’s time to taste the chocolate, an educated palate can recognize the complexity.

What are the challenges you faced in maintaining everything organic?

In the beginning, the resistance of the old farmers, resistant to accept that our methods gave results. I’m talking about the workers at the farms. But soon, they saw that the fruits were healthier. Today, the farmers believe in organic management and use our methods. There’s an evident rebirth in the region, through the organic culture.

What benefits do your workers receive?

On the farms, workers are our partners, so we share the profits of our sales. In the factory, we have 20 workers. There, as well, we want everyone to take part in the profits.

Why the sudden push now in Brazil for better quality chocolate?

Premium chocolate, or terroir, appeared in the last nine, 10 years. With Amma, things began to change when we started planting organic cocoa, also during that same time. The Brazilian rainforest has the biggest biodiversity per square meter on the planet. And our cocoa is planted in its shade. We have in the composition of our fruits, the essence of the richest elements on Earth!

AmmaChocolates-image-4 AmmaChocolates-image5

“Our chocolate is organically elaborated from beans coming from trees planted beneath the shade of the Atlantic Rainforest, in the South of Bahia – the biggest biodiversity per square meter in the planet. The cacao beans that will soon become AMMA’s sophisticated chocolate are selected in the Rio de Contas valley, in Itacaré, Bahia, Brazil. These beans, children of the rainforest and its biodiversity, give rise to the rich nuances characterizing AMMA’s flavor.” ammachocolate.com

Nu bij ons te verkrijgen: http://www.patisserievercruysse.be

 

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Chocolate Forever 2

This book explores the knowledge needed for achieving a sustainable cocoa chain and the gatekeepers of thise knowledge. It tells the story mainly from a Dutch perspective, focusing on the knowledge needs of actors involved in cocoa in the Netherlands, and their knowledge partners.

…Fifteen years from now (…) cocoa beans will be transported in the most sustainable way: in mega-bulk ships sailing towards Amsterdam! The port of Amsterdam has introduced a reduced sea harbor tariff for certified beans, to further promote their production and use. Storage and trans-shipment of beans is being done in the most fficient way, as bulk cranes with energy efficient motors and innovative flywheels offload beans. The vermin in the warehouses is eradicated without using environmentally harmful substances. The space in the harbour is also being used as efficiently as possible; as many tonnes as possible have to be used per square meter for trans-shipment and storage. Transport from the warehouses to the processors mainly takes place on barges because of their low CO2 emission and contribution to reducing traffic jams (…)

This story illustrate the vision of James Hallworth, Commercial Manager Bulk Logistics at the Port of Amsterdam, who describing how the cocoa transport storage and trans-shipment in the Netherlands might look fifteen years from now. The Port of Amsterdam is the world’s largest cocoa harbour and the Region of Amsterdam (Zaanstreek) is home to the most complete cocoa network in the world.

This commitment raises a set of questions, regarding the kind of knowledge needed for achieving a sustainable cocoa chain and the gatekeepers of this knowledge. A sustainable cocoa chain involves a process of continuous improvement. How can one ensure that the right knowledge is being developed at the right moment and, in particular, that the available knowledge will be effectively used by the people who need it the most? One must take into consideration the different perspectives on sustainability of the cocoa chain, as well as the different interests covered by the ‘knowledge agenda’, i.e. whose interests are included and whose are left out?

The general aim of this publication on sustainable cocoa in the Netherlands is to examine the question of knowledge and the availability of expertise in the country, and to further compare Dutch cocoa knowledge with the knowledge in the broader international spere. This comparison will serve to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Dutch cocoa knowledge infrastructure and to provide recommendations for improving its international position.

The publication: This book is part of a wider effort that seeks to achieve sustainable cocoa consuption in the Netherlands within fifteen years (Cocoa that will fall under sustainable cocoa includes for ex. certified organic cocoa, Fair Trade cocoa, Rainforest alliance, and cocoa certified by UTZ CERTIFIED) and to contibute to the global sustainable cocoa economy (people, planet profit). It examens the status of the Dutch knowledge sector and how it can strengthen its knowledge base.The publication aims to present all themes and questions in a way that will do justice to the complexity of the topic, without engaging in in-depth scientific analysis of the subject matter.

Structure of the publication: Chapter 2- Knowledge on sustainable value chains. Chapter 3- The position of the Dutch cocoa sector in the international cocoa chain. Chapter 4- The issues at stake. Chapter 5- Knowledge demand versus supply. Chapter 6- What do the Dutch know? Chapter 7- Recommendations for a sustainable knowledge base.

 

 

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Gender & Certified Value Chains.

This is what I learned and wanted to share after seeing the dvd received at the Origin Chocolate Event Amsterdam.

Global standard-setting organisations fro example, organic, Fair-Trade, Utz, 4C, Rainforest Alliance aim to improve the social, envirinmenttal, economic, and health and safety conditions for agricultural productions and processing. These organisations work to continuously improve their standards contributing to sustainable and inclusive value chain development.

The featured film captures key learning and experiences from a workshop on gender equity in global certified coffee, tea and cocoa value chains. It includes interviews with representatives from producer organisations, support services, standard setting organisations and certification bodies as well as the private sector.

Learning session in Kenia on gender & certified value chains.

What are the challenges?

If we look at like certification like organic, the standard that is audited by an organisation like Soil Association, we find that mainly it looks at the good agricultural practices. But when you look further, at the social aspects such as equity and non discrimination plus other social aspects they are not addressed in the standards. And until such aspects have been captured in the standards, thant’s the only written fact that they will be implemented uniformly across of the production sites, wheter in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania or anywhere else in the world.

So in fact that, as of now, various growers may come up with their own initiatives and implement but that may not be replicated in other growing sites across the various countries where certification is implemented.

“Social issues are not addressed adequately in many global standards.”

Local initiatives can be a source of learning for further development of standards.

Thank to Anna Lavan, research en development of the KIT, www.kit.nl  sharing me the DVD Gender&Certfied Value Chains.

Also I would like to share the following www.directcacao.org  DIRECT CACAO A new voice for fine cacao and chocolate.

Direct is a new organisation seeking to preserve and protect fien cacao through respect, value and mutual benefit for consumers and chocolate producers.

We believe that the only way to guarantee the future of fine cacao, and so the future of great fine chocolate, is by making sure that the farmers are properly rewarded for the cacao they produce. This can only be achieved through close links between the consumer, chocolate company and cacao farmer.

We aim to create a sustainable cycle based on quality and taste through short-chain Directly Traded fiencacao. We believe taht this is essential for preserving the environment, the livelihoods of farmer and for creating great tasting chocolate.

We NOT believe that ethical labeling schermes can achieve this and in fact can actually be detrimental to a fair and equitable trade in cacao.

Direct Cacao brings together chocolate makers and companies, chocolatiers, cacao growers and companies and independents to begin a new relationship based on a true respect for fine cacao.

 

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How Chocolate Can Save the Planet by Joanne Silberner

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16354380

 Joao Tavares, a fourth-generation cocoa farmer Anna Vigran, NPR

Joao Tavares, a fourth-generation cocoa farmer in the eastern state of Bahia, Brazil, grows chocolate using a method called cabruca. His cacao trees are grown under the canopy of larger rainforest trees.

Many people agree that chocolate is good for the soul, and researchers are finding that chocolate can be good for the body, too. But the environment? How could chocolate help with global climate change?

The answer is found in a little piece of paradise, a patch of rainforest in eastern Brazil. Everywhere you look, something is growing. Orchids nestle in the crooks of trees. There are hundreds of shades of green, and the forest is loud with birds and insects.

Some areas have been thinned out and planted with cacao trees — the source of chocolate. The pods contain the magical beans that Aztecs counted like gold. The cultivated cacao trees grow just a bit higher than a man can reach, and rainforest trees tower over them like something out of Dr. Seuss — some round like lollipops, some flat like a plate.

And here’s the climate connection. Rainforest trees and plants store massive amounts of carbon — keeping it from getting into the air as carbon dioxide.

Cocoa pods grow directly off the trunk of a cacao tree. Anna Vigran, NPR

Cocoa pods grow directly off the trunk of a cacao tree. The seeds inside are roasted and fermented to make chocolate

Can Chocolate Help Save the Rainforest?

There’s a lot less rainforest than there once was. There used to be 330 million acres of rainforest in eastern Brazil, called the Mata Atlantica. Settlers arrived hundreds of years ago and began destroying the forest for the wood, and to create fields for pasture and crops. Only 7 percent of the Mata Atlantica remains, and destruction is still going on. Every time a tree is burned, its stored carbon is released. As more carbon is released into the air, the planet gets warmer.

That worries Dario Ahnert, a plant expert at the State University of Santa Cruz in Eastern Brazil. He says farmers need an incentive to save the remaining forest, and he hopes chocolate will be that incentive.

Chocolate used to be a huge industry here, but in the past two decades, plant disease and low prices in the world market for cocoa beans devastated the industry. Farmers turned to other ways of making a living, including logging trees or burning the forest for farmland or pasture. When the nutrients in the soil were used up, the land was abandoned.

Ahnert wants to persuade farmers to return to chocolate farming and preserve the forest. His friend, Joao Tavares, shows it can be done.

Dario Ahnert, a plant expert at the State University of Santa Cruz Anna Vigran, NPR

Dario Ahnert, a plant expert at the State University of Santa Cruz in eastern Brazil, is trying to help farmers grow chocolate that is both profitable and helps preserve the forest.

Cabruca Farming

Joao Tavares is a fourth-generation cocoa producer. Tavares, along with his brother and father, has 2,200 acres of rainforest planted with cacao trees. They grow cocoa using a method called cabruca — cutting down just a few of the tall rainforest trees, and planting the mid-height cacao trees underneath.

Inside Tavares’ cabruca forest, the ground is covered in a thick layer of composting leaves. It’s moist, shady and cool here in the cabruca. Football-shaped pods — striped in yellow and green and orange and brown — jut out from the trunks and branches of the cacao trees.

Tavares has worked hard to maintain, and also to restore, his little piece of the rainforest. He says that in the past 10 years, he has planted many wild trees.

“We understand that we have to preserve the cabruca,” Tavares says, “even if you have less production.”

He gets fewer cacao trees to the acre by planting inside the forest. But he avoids the drawbacks other farmers struggle with when they grow cacao trees on more open land.

“You have more production, but you have lots of problems,” Tavares explains. “You have more disease, more insects, so we decide to preserve.”

There’s also an expanding market for environmentally friendly chocolate. Tavares has been able to get a premium for some of his crop.

Tavares' cocoa plantation. Joanne Silberner, NPR

Tavares has planted his cacao trees — the source of chocolate — under a taller canopy of rainforest trees in cabruca-style farming.

Carbon Credits for Farmers?

Still, his friend, professor Ahnert, admits that cabruca is a tough sell: Farmers want more so-called modern approaches and quicker money. That’s why Ahnert hopes that cabruca can become part of the carbon credit market. Farmers would then get money for preserving forest trees, as well as for their chocolate.

“You could increase the income, so I hope some day people that maintain this area are able to get carbon credits,” Ahnert says.

The World Agroforestry Center and the chocolate manufacturer Mars Inc. are currently studying how carbon storage can be measured on cabruca-like farms, and whether a carbon credit system would help farmers — and the environment.

A worker on Tavares' farm rakes cocoa beans drying in the sun. Anna Vigran, NPR

The cocoa beans are dried in the sun. A worker on Tavares’ farm rakes them to make sure they are all exposed and dried evenly.

Reviving the Land through Chocolate

And there’s an even more ambitious idea out there. Howard Shapiro, chief agronomist at Mars, hopes that chocolate could even bring back a little of the forest paradise that’s been lost.

He’s doing tests with local scientists at Brazil’s national chocolate research institute.

“This is an area that’s been planted on degraded land,” Shapiro says, giving a tour of the three-acre research plot.

After the forest disappeared, the soil became hard and compact, like yellow cement. Only weeds grew in it. Shapiro and his colleagues asked local farmers what sort of plants they would like, both in the long run and while they wait for the soil to become rich enough to support cacao trees.

“What we decided to do was, we would begin with annual crops,” Shapiro explains. “Corn, beans — things that have a cash crop value — melons, squashes, and begin to establish bananas for shade, then start to plant cacao.”

They also planted rubber trees, and heliconium flowers. The first plants went in seven years ago. Now it’s easy to grab a handful of soil. It’s dark brown, moist and crumbly, like devil’s food cake — with worms. But the worms are good for the soil.

  Howard Shapiro, chief agronomist at chocolate manufacturer Mars Inc. Anna Vigran, NPR

Howard Shapiro, chief agronomist at chocolate manufacturer Mars Inc., is working with Brazil’s national chocolate research institute to make abandoned, deforested land profitable again. The experiment includes planting many cash crops, including chocolate.

“See all the little flowers on this tree?” Shapiro asks, pointing to a cacao tree. “All those little pink buds. … It’s healthy. These trees are healthy.”

Shapiro wants to work out the details, but he’s ready to say the project is a success. “We learned that you could take totally abandoned land, and you could restore it to profitability after about three years,” he says.

So, will preserving, and even replanting, some of this forest in eastern Brazil fix the Earth’s climate problem? No. But in this little corner of the world, it may help. And at least we’ll have more chocolate.

Produced by Anna Vigran

NPR encourages and permits links to content on the NPR Services. However, NPR is an organization committed to the highest journalistic ethics and standards and to independent, noncommercial journalism, both in fact and in appearance. Therefore, the linking should not (a) suggest that NPR promotes or endorses any third party’s causes, ideas, web sites, products or services, or (b) use NPR content for inappropriate commercial purposes or in any way that is unlawful or harmful to any other person or entity. We reserve the right to withdraw permission for any link.

 

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